Courses

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Courses

General Studies Course Descriptions

  1. Introduction to Global Cultures

  2. A freshman course that introduces students to broad, universal issues in liberal education (diversity around the world, differences among cultures, pathways to understanding each other, etc. ) The course will be conducted through a web site, with guest faculty invited to participate from around the world and with specific collaborative exercises with students from universities abroad. Also available as an online course.

  3. College Writing I (Freshman Year 1)

  4. A composition course that provides rigorous training in writing. The course is designed specifically for students of media as they explore forms of writing, grammar, style and their applications in the media. Emphasis on understanding and summary of the argument.
     

  5. College Writing II (Freshman Year 1)

  6. Continuation of basic exercises in writing. Emphasis on analysis and critique.
     

  7. Freshman Humanities Core

  8. Required of all freshman students, this course provides a systematic and thematic examination of one or more of the key issues in liberal education. Topics may include cultural identity and history, cultural identity and globalization, forms of government around the world, major social movements in the 20th Century, etc. The course will consist of common lectures as well as small group discussions in sections.
     

  9. Social Science Core

  10. This course examines one or more of the key issues in social sciences. Topics may include social inequality, philosophies of macroeconomics, economic development around the world, and cultural diversity and conflict. The course will consist of common lectures as well as small group discussions in sections.
     

  11. Systems of Thought

  12. This course provides an examination of some of the philosophical, analytical approaches in thinking. The course synthesizes approaches to religion, history, regional philosophies, relationship between philosophy and ways of life etc. The course may also explore the dynamics of relations between the East and the West.

 

Media Common Course Descriptions

  1. Introduction to Mass Media

  2. Examination of the historical, intellectual, social, economic, cultural, and political influences that have shaped present day mass communication and the effects of mass communication industries, contents, and processes on contemporary society. Survey of mass communication theories and the interaction of mass communications and society.
     

  3. Visual Communication

  4. Elements of visual literacy, design, visual concepts, illustration styles, forms and techniques, composition, typography, color theory, graphic and design techniques. Theory and application of visual communication in newspapers, magazines, television news, advertising, and public relations.
     

  5. Introduction to Digital Communications

  6. The course will examine the evolving nature of digital communications, understanding of the basic concepts of Internet technologies and web content, and the central issues of digital media culture.
     

  7. Mass Media Studies

  8. A broad survey of analytical approaches to mass media. Topics include media effects, media consumption, democracy and the media, processes of international communications and the role of technology in media.
     

  9. International Communication

  10. Comparative study of communication and media systems. Information gathering and dissemination under different political and cultural systems. Global news and information flows, implications of rapid technological change, and communication and information policies.
     

  11. Writing for the Mass Media

  12. Introduction to the fundamentals of reporting and writing for the print and broadcast news media: news concepts, leads, story structure, news style, editing.
     

  13. Media Internship

  14. Each student will work in a media organization, under the supervision of both the workplace supervisor and a faculty advisor. The course will begin with a clear statement of objectives. Students will write a log of their activities and will present a final statement assessing the experience.
     

  15. Junior Project

  16. A project based course in student’s selected track to be completed during the junior year. The project should culminate in a publishable quality print, digital or broadcast work.
     

  17. Senior Capstone Project

  18. Two semester capstone project in student’s selected track to be completed during the senior year. The project will be a clear demonstration of the skills and understanding of the issues and perspectives in mass media.
     

  19. Special Topics in Mass Communications

  20. Contemporary issues in mass communication are explored, with topics varying from semester to semester. Frequently these courses will be conducted online in collaboration with faculty abroad or may include collaborative projects with students from an overseas university.

 

Print and Online Journalism

  1. Public Affairs Reporting

  2. Advanced reporting and writing techniques, with an emphasis on investigative and interpretive reporting, information gathering skills, etc. Rights and responsibilities of public communicators.
     

  3. Graphic Design

  4. Principles and practices of design, typography, graphics and production for visual communication for print and electronic media. Computer graphics and pagination. Techniques of news evaluation, copy editing, headline writing, picture editing, illustration, editorial strategy and design, and layout.
     

  5. Online Journalism

  6. Techniques of good online journalism, exploring both the editorial and commercial aspects of the Web. Also covers online laws, management, and economics.
     

  7. Feature Writing

  8. Practice in planning, research, reporting, writing, and marketing nonfiction articles to general and specialized magazines and newspapers.
     

  9. Media Management

  10. Understanding of the principles of media management and examination of the economics of the media business.
     

  11. Media Law

  12. Legal doctrines of political and commercial speech, press freedom and censorship, including libel, privacy, copyright, etc. Study of the legal rights and constraints of mass communications industries, including print, broadcast and cable media. Discussion of the ethics and criticism of the practice of journalism, advertising and public relations.

 

Advertising & Public Relations

  1. Advertising and Public Relations

  2. Introduction to the theory, principles, and practices of advertising, including market research, planning and designing messages, and media buying. Public relations theory and practices, identification and analysis of publics and design and execution and assessment of communication strategies.
     

  3. Advertising Campaigns

  4. Planning and executing advertising campaigns, types and methods of advertising research.
     

  5. Media Planning

  6. Media planning fundamentals, such as buying, audience measurement, media research, new media concepts, audience segmentation and sales presentation, etc. How different media enhance the persuasive power of advertising messages.
     

  7. Advertising Copy Writing

  8. Theory and practice in writing advertising copy. Study of style and structure with emphasis on strategy formulation.
     

  9. Public Relations Techniques

  10. Theory and practice of public relations techniques and procedures. Analysis and production of print, electronic, and oral messages for organizational objectives; fundamentals of media relations; management of programs to enhance public-organizational relationships.
     

  11. Media Law

  12. Legal doctrines of political and commercial speech, press freedom and censorship, including libel, privacy, copyright, etc. Study of the legal rights and constraints of mass communications industries, including print, broadcast and cable media. Discussion of the ethics and criticism of the practice of journalism, advertising and public relations.

 

Broadcasting & Online Journalism

  1. Radio Production

  2. Introduction to the technology and practice of radio. Students will begin with the principles of sound and cover all aspects of radio production, with a special emphasis on programming and live broadcasts.
     

  3. Television Production

  4. Basics of studio based television production. Covers all aspects of recording technologies, pre-production process, studio production and live as well as taped recording of programs.
     

  5. Multimedia Storytelling

  6. Examination of story concepts and tools of storytelling to communicate in different forms. Emphasis on how story structures change with audience and delivery system. The basics of cross-media writing for the web.
     

  7. Writing for Video

  8. An intensive practical course with instruction and exercises in writing for video. Covers several formats of writing. Students are expected to produce two complete scripts in different forms of video (e.g. features, fiction, experimental etc.)
     

  9. Broadcast Management

  10. Introduction to all aspects of managing a broadcast station. Topics covered include policy, legal relations, public relations, managing programs, financial and human resources for the station.
     

  11. Freedom, Rights and Entertainment

  12. A comprehensive survey of the legal issues in broadcasting, both nationally and internationally. Topics include the role of U.N. organizations in regulating broadcasting across the borders, the uses of outer space technologies for broadcasting, principles of entertainment and freedom in broadcasting in international sphere.

 

Digital Media & Multimedia

  1. Multimedia Storytelling

  2. Examination of story concepts and tools of storytelling to communicate in different forms. Emphasis on how story structures change with audience and delivery system. The basics of cross-media writing for the web.
     

  3. Digital Communications Systems

  4. Introduction to digital communications systems, identifying audiences and channels and appropriate content. Audience acquisition platforms, such as social media, search, online advertising; content management systems and content strategies; data management and analysis, etc.
     

  5. Web Design and Multimedia

  6. Principles of web site construction and of visual and information organization. Html coding, flash, cascading stylesheets, fluid design, video and audio streaming to develop functional and visually evocative web sites.
     

  7. Introduction to Digital Culture

  8. How digital technologies are reconfiguring conceptions of representation, relationships, community, gender, identity, location, space, meaning and social and cultural narrative.
     

  9. Online Journalism

  10. Techniques of good online journalism, exploring both the editorial and commercial aspects of the Web. Also covers online laws, management, and economics.
     

  11. Media Law

  12. Legal doctrines of political and commercial speech, press freedom and censorship, including libel, privacy, copyright, etc. Study of the legal rights and constraints of mass communications industries, including print, broadcast and cable media. Discussion of the ethics and criticism of the practice of journalism, advertising and public relations.

 

Electives in Media Studies

Students must select nine media elective courses from among those listed below. The electives offer them an opportunity to broaden their academic experience with courses from other media tracks or to sharpen their skills in their core track.
 

  • Advanced Radio Production: Covers field recording, post production techniques, programming strategies and broadcasting for various formats.
  • Radio Documentaries and Dramas: A studio and field based course that allows students to learn the process of producing for radio in fiction and non-fiction formats. Covers research for documentary subjects, various recording techniques and production of radio dramas.
  • Advanced Television Production:: The course covers post production editing in addition to varied formats of live taping of programs. Students will learn to use all aspects of television production, including sound, light and image.
  • Film Production: The process of film production, including storyboarding, script blocking, pre-planning with hired talent and shooting the film.
  • Advanced Film Production: With a special emphasis on post production, the course covers advanced aspects of film production. Students are expected to produce a short film with the production process controlled by students and their classmates as members of the production team.
  • Editing Film: The course covers several approaches and techniques of editing film. Students will learn diverse editing techniques and styles in appropriate relation to their film projects. Includes a broad survey of editing techniques of films in India, Europe and the United States.
  • Live Radio (studio, Internet and independent): A studio course that provides technical and practical background in producing and broadcasting live radio. Includes the current trends and technologies in broadcasting over the Internet, ham and experimental radio and explores the opportunities for freelancing as an independent producer around the world.
  • Creative Video: A video production course that allows students to develop projects beyond narrative, news or fictional format. The course explores the potential of video as an art form akin to poetry, painting and experimental arts.
  • Streaming Video Technologies: This course provides state-of-the-art training in producing and broadcasting video over the Internet. Will utilize the current software, exploring and assessing the strength of different technologies of broadcasting and reception and examines the current performance and potential of streaming technologies.
  • Television Scriptwriting: A hands-on, intensive course in scriptwriting for fictional/dramatic television. Includes close analysis of the current approaches to narrative construction, genre expectations and cultural codes in television programming. Students will present two completed scripts for short format and long format television dramas.
  • Entertainment Television: A comprehensive study of the dominant form of television around the world and in India. The course covers areas such as the reach of entertainment television the U.S., regional success stories (e.g. telenovelas in Latin America), and attempts at developing distinct national character in various countries. The course will assess the potential and performance of narrative/entertainment television in India, broadcast by national and international networks.
  • Film Styles and Film Form: A course in fundamentals of film analysis. With the classical Hollywood and Bollywood narratives as standard backdrops, the course will explore the diversity and complexity of film styles by different directors and genres around the world and in India. The course emphasizes analytical skills and systematic expression in writing film reviews.
  • Indian Cinema Century: A broad and wide ranging examination and survey of the hundred years of Indian cinema. The course will focus on the developments in Bollywood cinema as well as the new wave/s on national and regional levels. Students will be able to develop specific areas of study in regional cinemas.
  • Experimental Film: A practical, production intensive course in non-narrative experimental cinema. Students will conceive, plan, prepare, shoot and edit two short films as part of the course.
  • Internet and Democracy: An analytical course that examines the worldwide use of the Internet in sustaining and supporting the values of democracies. From chat rooms to campaigns, to political revolutions, and from Internet cafés to Instant messaging services, the course will critically examine the issues that are presented to us by the Internet.
  • Media Lab: A laboratory course designed to give students hands on experience working at campus media, in newspaper, magazine, radio, or advertising.
  • Magazine Publishing: Examines the business aspects of magazine publishing, including circulation, advertising, promotion, administration, production and editorial. Understanding of the market and competition, building editorial, production, advertising and circulation strategies, and financial aspects of the magazine project.
  • Visual News Reporting: Techniques for telling compelling stories by utilizing various forms of digital media, combining audio, still images and motion.
  • Editing: Preparation of copy for publication. Headline writing. Correction of copy. Evaluation of news. Condensation of news stories. News display and makeup.
  • Web Journalism and Innovation: Production of engaging Web stories utilizing multimedia skills; interactive Web production systems; the rapidly changing media landscape.
  • Creative Advertising Strategies: A look at the most creative advertising strategies and advertising agencies. Examination of successful ad campaigns, analyzing their content, style and effectiveness across cultures.
  • Case Studies in Advertising: Analysis of cases and studies in marketing communications.
  • Broadcast and Digital Newswriting: Basic style and construction of broadcast and digital news stories. Composing and writing radio, television, and web news stories under deadline pressure. Techniques of broadcast interviewing and information gathering.
  • Media Ethics: Evaluation of media performance, ethics, and practices. Role of media in society.
  • Radio and Digital Audio News Reporting: Reporting and producing news in the radio and digital audio medium.
  • Television and Digital News Reporting: Deadline news reporting and production for television and digital media.
  • Newscast Production and Management: The theory and practice of producing television newscasts; basics of broadcast news management.
  • Digital Branding and Strategy: Use of social networks, blogs, wikis, mobile and other digital media forms in branding and marketing strategies.
  • Advanced Web Design: Programming and scripting for advanced web applications, dynamic content, etc.
  • Public Relations Principles and Concepts: Introduction to public relations, its history and its future; ethics and social responsibility; social media impact.
  • Public Relations Writing for a Digital World: Public relations writing for digital and traditional outlets; media relations writing; crisis communications; news conferences.
  • Digital Media Management: Introduction to digital media management, competitive strategy, media segmentation, and the management of innovation.
  • Digital Filmmaking I: Basic DV camera operations, elementary nonlinear editing and video production.
  • Audio Recording: Analog and digital recording; selection of mikes; boom techniques; sync systems; radio mikes; sound mixing; set protocol; recording narration; and sound effects.
  • Digital Editing I: Logging and capturing footage, editing, trimming, motion effects, audio mixing, generating and EDL, exporting digital file formats.
  • Information Design: Fundamentals of information architecture, navigation systems, and user experience.
  • Fundamentals of Multimedia: Learn the basics of digital multimedia, including foundations of image and motion design.
  • Digital Media Literacy and Skills: Introduction to digital history and aesthetic, gaming, instant messaging, artificial intelligence, computer graphics, digital design and the Internet.
  • Animation and Special Effects: Introduction to digital animation, special effects, modeling and animating in the 3D virtual environment.
  • Game History and Development: History of digital and electronic games and platforms and the technologies and culture around them. Principles of game design and the social and cultural context of games, and the application of these concepts.
  • Experience Design and Narrative: Non-linear narratives, online interactive storytelling, alternative reality and narrative structures in game systems, interactivity and experience.
  • 3D Animation: Skill-based introduction to the theories and practices of 3D GI for animation.
  • Special Topics on Media: Specialized topics based on expertise of visiting Indian and overseas faculty.

 

General Studies Electives

Students must select four elective courses from the general studies curriculum, options for which are listed below:
 

  • Indian Modernism
    An introductory survey of modernism from the art of Ashoka to Mughal period. A close study of the canonical works and the movements inspired by them.
  • Renaissance to Modern Art
    A close study of the movement of Renaissance in Western Europe until the major art movements of the early Twentieth Century. The course examines the relationship between the domination of the codes of Renaissance and the rise of technologies of mechanical reproduction of images as well as modern art.
  • Folk Arts and Living Cultures
    A broad survey of the major regional movements in art and folk cultures in India. Students will study the rise of art forms such as Nautanki, Tamasha, Kirtans and folk songs including peasant cultures.
  • Fundamentals of Sociology
    An introduction to the issues in the study of sociology. Beginning with an appraisal of the classical models of Durkheim and Weber, the course will also cover some of the issues in social divisions and distribution, hierarchy, marriage systems, and economic of the small regions.
  • Sociology of India
    The course provides a general overview of social conditions, including regional, linguistic, economic, and cultural studies of the Indian population.
  • Family and Kinship
    A study of the genealogy of family systems in rural and urban areas.
  • English Literature by Indian Authors
    A study of English literature by Indian authors in India and around the world.
  • Literature and Indian Identity
    A close study of the role literature has played in shaping the identity of the nation as well as that of specific regions and cultures of India.
  • World History
    This course presents a systematic examination of key historical periods and moments in the history of India and the world. Meant to provide an historical awareness in the present, the students will be exposed to the methods of historical learning and understanding historical changes.
  • India Before Independence
    Study of the history of India before independence from 1700 to 1947.
  • India After Independence
    The study of post-independence India, its politics, major historical movements, crises, and achievements.
  • Special Topics in History
    Specialised courses on regional and national historical events and characters.
  • Public Speaking
    Developing skills in delivering public speeches and presentations through research, preparation and training in diction.
  • Role Playing and Improvisation
    A study of individuals in social situations with exercises in social adaptation, conflict and accommodation.
  • Group Dynamics and Performance
    Examination of group dynamics, its thinking processes and consensus building and leadership.
  • Publics of Science
    Designed to provide a broad understanding of the role of science in our public life, this course will examine key issues and perspectives on the relationship between science and environment, development, technology, and progress. Emphasis is on acquiring a necessary understanding of science in everyday life.
  • Statistics
    Basic course in statistics and applications of statistics in social sciences and humanities.
  • Applied Mathematics
    An introductory course in applied mathematics, including quantitative models and logic.
  • Science and Social Development
    Designed to provide a broad understanding of the role of science in our public life, this course will examine key issues and perspectives on the relationship between science and environment, development, technology, and progress. Emphasis is on acquiring a necessary understanding of science in everyday life.
  • Special Topics in Humanities & Social Science
    Specialized topics based on expertise of visiting Indian and overseas faculty.

 
Courses and programs are subject to change.